How Venezuela is testing our relationship

© Carlos Garcia Rawlins/Reuters

Ali and I ended up fighting last night and to be honest, it did not even surprise me. I somehow expected that the tension of the past days and weeks would sooner or later be released within our interactions. I don’t even remember how it all started but the primary reason was an opinion I picked up from this blog article. The (foreign) author living in Venezuela argues that it seems like many Venezuelans rely on and hope for foreign (foremost U.S.) intervention to improve the situation in Venezuela. I have read numerous tweets and comments like that on the internet as well, so I mentioned this to Ali. I said that maybe one of the reasons why Ukrainians have been more successful in their protests is the level of organisation among the opposition and people relying less on influence from the outside and more on their own actions – even at risk of their own death.

Well, to put it mildly, Ali wasn’t too happy about my remarks and felt like I had just accused the entire nation of his homeland of being lazy couch potatoes – and well, maybe without wanting to I did.

It is true that I – as a foreigner who has only spent a few months in Venezuela and has only basic Spanish language skills – am not as involved and informed as any Venezuelan citizen, although I try my best to keep up with domestic politics. What I can offer, though, are neutral opinions about what I read and experience – something many Venezuelans seem to have willingly forgotten. I think it’s critical to demand press freedom and at the same time not considering anything that differs from your own solid notions. Not everyone who doesn’t completely agree with you is automatically your enemy. That being said I know it is far easier to ask for such virtous behavior when I am not directly affected by the events in Venezuela. I am, however, indirectly affected: with Ali wanting to leave as soon as possible I will have to adjust my future plans as well and of course I identify with his home country.

And just to be clear about this and before I receive hate comments, I would never dare to blame or criticize anyone for being too afraid to go out and demonstrate when you cannot besure if you will be shot on the spot. I’m pretty sure I wouldn not be brave enough myself. I am merely saying that the people of Ukraine seemed more reckless at the end than Venezuelans are at the moment – which might have been one of the reasons they have overthrown their government when protests in Venezuela seem rather smoldering to me. And God forbid, I am not calling for violence in any way. What Venezuela really needs, in my opinion, is national reconciliation and an end to thinking in social classes. 

The essence of our fight would probably be me acting less omiscient when it comes to Venezuelan politics and Ali reconsidering his attitude towards views conflicting with his own opinion. Maybe a lesson everyone in the discussion about recent protest in Venezuela should take to their hearts? Certainly.

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